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Take Action on the Chaplin Lake wind turbine project

7 Jun

Two actions can help influence the Chaplin Lake wind turbine project decision and future wind turbine projects.

1. Contact the Saskatchewan Environment Minister.

Saskatchewan’s Minister of the Environment, Herb Cox, is currently considering options for approving the controversial wind energy project by Chaplin Lake  Chaplin Lake is an internationally important shorebird staging wetland, used by thousands of birds as they migrate seasonally, including many endangered species. The proposed project of 79 turbines would include 25 to 34 turbines on native grasslands, affecting 62 hectares (153 acres) that support several species at risk in breeding season. The project area would also be cut by roads, transmissions lines and other vertical structures such as buildings.

PPPI and many other groups interested in grassland conservation, including Nature Saskatchewan and Nature Canada, believe that the project should be moved off the native grassland and onto alternative/cultivated land.

Last November people wrote in their concerns and analysis to the environmental assessment process and this caused additional consultation and reflection on the project. We are encouraging people to review the material in the NEWS items below, and send letters or emails to Minister Cox strongly urging him to insist that the wind project be moved off native grassland.

Hon. Herb Cox, Minister of Environment
Mailing Address Room 38, Legislative Building, 2405 Legislative Drive, Regina, SK, Canada, S4S 0B3
E-mail: env.minister@gov.sk.ca
Phone (306) 787-0393
Fax (306) 787-1669

2. Provide input concerning draft guidelines being developed for wind energy projects in Saskatchewan,
A meeting was held May 31 with Saskatchewan Environment officials and representatives of conservation groups and comments on the draft guidelines were invited. The turn around is tight – the deadline for comments is June 15, but the document is not too long. Contact PPPI if you are interested in contributing to this effort.

PFRA pastures in Sask make National Trust endangered places list

1 Jun

Two articles this week highlighted the placement of the former PFRA pastures in Saskatchewan on the National Trust’s list of endangered places. CBC ran this article and the Leader-Post ran this article, from which the following quote is taken:

The Public Pastures – Public Interest group is quite pleased to see the pastures on the list. The group has been campaigning for years for the conservation of the pastures.

“We’re trying to end up with some form of assistance, some form of guarantee that the pastures will remain publicly owned and managed for livestock producing as well for species at risk, biodiversity and basically continue on the same track that the PFRA system had developed,” said Lorne Scott, co-chair of Public Pastures – Public Interest.

Weighing in on Species at Risk protection in southwest Saskatchewan

27 May

The proposed Action Plan for Multiple Species at Risk in Southwestern Saskatchewan: South of the Divide has now been posted on the Species at Risk Public Registry for a 60-day public comment period beginning May 24, 2016 and ending July 23, 2016.

You can follow the above link to read the plan and submit a comment by email. The plan is also available here and this form can be used when commenting.

News about the Wind Energy Project endangering bird populations at Chaplin Lake

26 May

A couple of recent Leader-Post articles by Ashley Robinson and Natascia Lypny are good reminders of the decline of migratory grassland bird populations and a conservation issue that will further endanger these birds.   The Wind Energy Project at Chaplin Lake calls for the installation of wind turbines on native prairie in an extremely critical area for migratory birds such as Sprague’s pipit and piping plover.

PPPI supports alternate energy sources, but this location is very concerning.  Along with conservationists from groups like Nature Conservancy of Canada, Nature Saskatchewan, the Saskatchewan Wildlife Federation and the Saskatchewan Environmental Society, we want to ensure that the turbines are not located in the sensitive globally significant habitat around Chaplin Lake.

Recent articles

http://leaderpost.com/news/local-news/grassland-birds-in-saskatchewan-under-threat-report by Ashley Robinson

http://leaderpost.com/news/saskatchewan/saskatchewan-government-developing-wind-energy-siting-guidelines by Natascia Lypny

And there are also articles from last year:

http://leaderpost.com/news/local-news/university-of-regina-researcher-concerned-about-songbird-population by Kerry Benjoe

http://leaderpost.com/news/local-news/wind-turbine-project-raises-concerns-over-bird-safety by Natascia Lypny

As well as Trevor Herriot’s “Grass Notes” blog:

http://trevorherriot.blogspot.ca/2016/05/a-trip-to-see-species-at-risk-at.html

http://trevorherriot.blogspot.ca/2016/05/chaplin-wind-project-will-be-going-ahead.html

Saskatoon Event – Northeast Swale and Conservation

23 Mar

“Paving Paradise”

April 18, 7-9 pm at the Frances Morrison Central Library Theatre

Join speakers Candace Savage and Larry Beasley after a viewing of the film “Division Street”.

FAPavingParadise02_16

Protected Areas: Saskatchewan’s “Geography of Hope” at risk

14 Mar

Is conservation an issue in the provincial election? Trevor Herriot argues, in the Leader-Post, that it should be:

In 2012, the federal government cut the PFRA community pasture program, placing the lion’s share of our protected grasslands in limbo. The Saskatchewan government chose to pass on management responsibility for these ecologically rich lands to private grazing corporations, offering to lease or sell them. By any application of the IUCN criteria for protection, you can no longer count conservation land stripped of its biodiversity programming, then leased or sold primarily for cattle grazing.

So where is Saskatchewan at then, once we remove the WHPA lands for sale and PFRA pastures from the tally of protected areas? Our protected area percentage drops from 8.7 to 6.34 per cent — nowhere near the 17-per-cent commitment under Canada’s 2020 Biodiversity Targets and Goals and half our original RAN commitment.

Making a Difference for the Community Pastures and our Grasslands

16 Feb

We have received word that there is a possibility that the new federal government may consider reviewing the Harper decision to dump the PFRA pastures system. However, we are told that, for that to happen, our elected MPs, and the Minister of Agriculture Canada in particular, must hear about it from concerned citizens.

So we are asking everyone to send letters to the Minister of Agriculture, and the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, as well as the Hon. Ralph Goodale and the Prime Minister as soon as possible (see addresses below).

We have a brief window of opportunity to convey our deep concerns over the demise of the PFRA Pastures in Saskatchewan and to ask for the federal government to halt the transfer of the pasture lands and conduct a full review of the Harper government’s decision.

Your letters need not be long and detailed. A simple approach is to ask the federal government to halt the transfer of these pastures to the province of Saskatchewan which is not recognizing, managing or investing in the value of public goods on these vanishing grasslands.

We have heard from government sources that it important to emphasize the climate change benefits of native grassland but you should use your own words and choose any of the points listed below stating why these grasslands are important to you (e.g. climate change mitigation, conservation, Species at Risk, hunting, etc.) Tell them you want to live in a Canada that protects endangered landscapes and sustainable agriculture initiatives like the PFRA system always did.

We would also like people to request a full Strategic Environmental Assessment of the risks to the natural and human heritage in the PFRA Pastures, in accordance with The Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals.

It is very important that you include your full name and address, even if you are sending an email. Politicians always note the location where correspondence comes from. Be sure to request a reply to your letter.

Below are some points you may wish to reference in your letter. We suggest you select two or three and use your own words.

–    The Community Pasture lands are not “just agricultural lands.”

–   These pastures contain the largest and best managed grasslands in Saskatchewan.

–   Some 80% of our natural landscape in southern Saskatchewan has been lost to development.

–   These pastures are part of Canada’s commitment to its 2020 Biodiversity Goals, in accordance with the Global Aichi Biodiversity Targets.

–   Prairie grasslands are vital elements of the public trust every bit as precious as our northern forests and lakes

–   The prairies have more Species at Risk than any other region of Canada.

–   Over 30 Species At Risk are found on the pastures.

–   Carbon sequestration is an important benefit of native grasslands.

–   Soil and water conservation is provided by the pastures.

–   Pastures contain many heritage sites from indigenous people and homesteaders.

–   Pastures provide important hunting opportunities, generating $70 million annually.

–   Keeping the pastures publicly owned is the best way to protect the many benefits they provide.

–   Indigenous rights to access the land based on international declarations would be harmed by privatization of the land.

–   Producers should not be expected to pay for managing the land for public benefits.

–  The many public benefits should be maintained and enhanced with public dollars.

–  The Canadian people’s 75 year investment in the Community Pastures could be lost by eliminating the federal support for Community Pastures.

Address your letters to:

The Hon. Lawrence MacAulay, Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

lawrence.macaulay@parl.gc.ca

Send copies to the PM and Ministers listed:

The Hon. Catherine McKenna, Minister of Environment and Climate Change.

Catherine.McKenna@parl.gc.ca

The Hon. Ralph Goodale, Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, and MP for Regina-Wascana

ralph.goodale@parl.gc.ca

The Hon. Carolyn Bennett, Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs

carolyn.bennett@parl.gc.ca

The Right  Hon. Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada

justin.trudeau@parl.gc.ca

If you send your letter by regular mail, all mailing addresses are: House of Commons, Ottawa, Ont. K1A 0A6

No postage is required on any mail addressed to the House of Commons.

Many thanks, for your support. We believe we have a chance to make a difference with this letter campaign. Your letters are very important and could help turn the tide.

Pasture Transitions in the News

2 Nov

With a new party in the decision-making seat, groups are calling on the federal government to delay the pasture transition.

Saskatchewan Pasture Transfers Should be Delayed: Conservation Groups

“What we want is an assurance of protection for the grasslands,” said Ignatiuk.

“Right now, the transfer agreements are divesting to the province and the patrons associations (will eventually) take them over … but there’s really no long-term assurance that those lands will be protected.”

Ignatiuk said his group has no objection to grazing, a practice that’s compatible with the Nature Saskatchewan’s conservation objectives.

PPPI screening a new documentary on grassland birds

23 Oct
Plight of the Grassland Birds
Plus: Panel discussion with bird biologists Kayla Balderson Burak, Jason Unruh, Ryan Fisher, and Stephen Davis.
Thursday November 19th at 7:00 p.m.
Royal Saskatchewan Museum, 2445 Albert St, Regina
 Free admission (suggested $10 donation), Refreshments will be served.

At 7:00 pm on Thursday, November 19 at the Royal Saskatchewan Museum Auditorium in Regina, Public Pastures – Public Interest is hosting a public screening of Plight of the Grassland Birds, a new Public Broadcasting Service documentary released this fall.
From the fields of New England and Canada to the vast plains of Montana to the deserts of Mexico, grassland birds are losing their habitats at an alarming rate. This new film from New Hampshire Public Television explores efforts to protect the birds and their habitats.

After the one hour documentary PPPI will hold a panel discussion on the status of Saskatchewan’s grassland birds with bird biologists Kayla Balderson Burak, Ryan Fisher, Jason Unruh, and Stephen Davis.

PPPI film night poster Final

Caledonia-Elmsthorpe Community Pasture Ride

26 Jun

PPPI is proud to support a public ride through the Caledonia-Elmsthorpe Community Pasture on Aug. 15 and/or 16, 2015. Ride, hike or walk the beautiful trail – enjoy vistas, rolling hills, wildlife & birds while enjoying virgin prairie that may not be available to the public very soon.

The pasture is located between Avonlea and Milestone and is home to species at risk, fossils and archeological sites.

Rider meetings are at 9 a.m. both days, and rides run between 9:30 a.m. – 5 p.m. Riders can enjoy a 30-mile ride and take in the vistas, rolling hills, wildlife and birds, and the beauty of the prairies

The ride costs $10 per person and $30 for families. For more information, email pastureride@gmail.com.

Links to registration form, waivers, poster, and more:

Registration Form | Waiver for minors | Waiver over 18 | Poster | Species at Risk | Protecting Public Pastures