Tag Archives: APAS

Lots of news coverage of PFRA Pastures Transition Study

19 Feb

– Leader Post article

Groups wants changes to provincial pasture plan

– Western Producer article

Pasture transition needs changes: Sask report

– Swift Current Online

APAS Calling for New Approach to Pasture Transition

and

Stewart Speaks on Pasture Lease Fees

– Saskatoon Home Page

Pasture Transition Needs Changes

– Grenfell Sun

APAS calls for new approach to PFRA pasture transition

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Joint PFRA Pasture Study Released

10 Feb

APAS Calls for New Approach to PFRA Pasture Transition

February 10, 2015

Regina: Agricultural Producers Association of Saskatchewan (APAS), Community Pasture Patrons Association of Saskatchewan (CPPAS), Public Pastures – Public Interest (PPPI) and Saskatchewan Wildlife Federation (SWF) examined Saskatchewan’s approach to pasture transition and found it would adversely affect the livestock industry in Saskatchewan.

“We are asking the Saskatchewan Government to take a hard look at its current approach to the transition of the 62 PFRA pastures which affects 1.8 million acres or 2,500 ranchers,” says Norm Hall, APAS President. “The current process is inefficient, short and long-term costs will rise substantially for patrons, and public expectations and regulations for pastures could prove to be unworkable.”

The study (executive summary here) commissioned by the four partners is anchored in the following principles:

  • Conserving native grassland is critically important;
  • Land use should re-inforce the economic viability of our livestock sector;
  • Natural working ecosystems must be preserved over the long term;
  • Business and governance systems must be efficient and effective;
  • Producers should not be expected to pay for public benefits.

(Full Report can be found here.)

The approach taken by Saskatchewan is to increase revenues at the expense of producers and to offload responsibility for the environment from the public sector to pasture patrons. Pasture patrons are being asked to pay a full Crown land grazing rate. They are required to provide full public access and manage and report on the ecological, environmental and endangered species on native landscapes without required resources. “A level playing field is required,’ says Ian McCreary, CPPAS Chair.

“Preserving a working natural landscape where hunters and naturalists can share the pasture system into the future must be maintained,” says Darrell Crabbe, Executive Director, SWF. “Pasture patrons cannot be expected to shoulder the costs of sourcing the expertise required and providing ongoing public benefits.”

“APAS is concerned over the long term viability of the livestock industry in Saskatchewan,” says Hall. “We have a shrinking beef breeding herd and livestock producer numbers are falling. The current approach leads to a further acceleration of producers leaving the industry. Pasture patrons may fall by one-half. The current approach closes the opportunity for young producers to enter the industry. A different approach is needed if we are to build a strong, sustainable Saskatchewan livestock industry.”

Norm Hall
President, APAS

Ian McCreary
Chair, CPPAS

Darrell Crabbe
Executive Director, SWF

Trevor Herriot
Public Pastures-Public Interest

More Farm Groups Weigh In

29 Jul

Handing over the pastures to the provinces isn’t as simple as it looks. This Leader-Post article elaborates:

“Norm Hall, president of APAS, said the umbrella farm organization would like to see the community pastures continue to be managed by the Prairie Farm Rehabilitation Administration and remain in Crown lands.

“Our position hasn’t changed. We’re still pushing for public ownership.” But Hall said the province should delay the transfer of pastures for a year until some of the issues are resolved.

For example, Hall said many of the community pastures contain federal land, which have to be made available to other federal ministries, Crown corporations and provincial departments, then to First Nations through the Treaty Land Entitlement process.”