Tag Archives: community pastures

Official Parliamentary Petition – Take Action!

12 Mar

As a result of recent developments in Ottawa and in the national media, PPPI has launched an official parliamentary petition to Hon. Catherine McKenna, federal Minister of Environment and Climate Change, calling on her to work with livestock producers, First Nations and Métis organizations, local committees and conservation organizations to create a multi-use prairie conservation network on all former PFRA Community Pastures.

Please fill out and share this petition with others before July 6th when it closes. Already it is garnering support across Canada  – we need 500 signatures in order for final certification.

https://petitions.parl.gc.ca/en/Petition/Details?Petition=e-927 

Grasslands are the most endangered, the most altered and yet the least protected ecosystem on the planet. The Community Pastures in Saskatchewan contain some of the largest, best managed and biodiverse rich blocks of remaining native grasslands in North America.  A conservation network will not only protect our grasslands but support Canada’s biodiversity Target 1 to protect 17% of all terrestrial areas and inland water. http://www.conservation2020canada.ca/pathway/

Lands Act Review – Opportunity to Comment

30 May

The provincial government has given people until June 3 to comment on new proposals concerning the Provincial Lands Act. There are implications for community pastures.

The government held consultations in the 2013, then put the issue on the backburner. Now they plan to introduce legislation and are giving people until June 3 to to comment on the highlights of their proposal.

Click here to read the notice of the final stage of consultation and, following, the Provincial Lands Act Amendment Proposal.

Saskatchewan Election: Protecting our Grasslands

22 Mar
With the Saskatchewan provincial election in full swing, and an election date of April 4, 2016, we have created some material for bringing forward the concerns about the PFRA Community Pastures and publicly-owned grasslands.
A handout to give candidates, with recommendations for things they can do. It is a thumbnail sketch of the complexities of the Community Pastures and grasslands issues, but we hope it conveys the essentials.
There are many ways to influence direction at at the time of an election.
  • Talk to the candidates that knock on your door or that you meet at events.Take courage – you have the right to present your views and even a short conversation has an effect.
  • Attend all-candidate forums and ask about the environment, agriculture, public pastures and grasslands, even though other issues seem to be dominating the airwaves.
  • Write a letter or email or make a phone call to your local candidates. Drop by their constituency office and have a chat about  your views.
  • Write a letter to the editor to the newspaper, or local community paper.
  • Put forward your views on social media.
  • Talk to your neighbours.
  • Do a creative video, or just a short simple interview on your camera or smartphone, and post it on You-Tube.
  • Send a message via Twitter
Grasslands could become an election issue!

PPPI AGM – March 19

7 Mar

We hope you can come out to the Public Pastures-Public Interest Annual General Meeting on March 19!

If you cannot attend in person, your ideas and suggestions are always appreciated via phone or e-mail.

Like any organization, we are always happy to have people come forward who are willing to assist with the individual tasks needed to carry out our work or to participate on the PPPI Board.

The agenda follows and can also be seen here: PPPI AGM 2016 agenda

PPPI Annual General Meeting

Saturday March 19, 2016, 10:00 am to 4:00 pm

United Way Building, 1440 Scarth St., Regina, Saskatchewan

9:30     Coffee and registration

10:00   Annual General Meeting

  • Welcome & Introductions
  • Report on past year – Highlights of PPPI activities and achievements  – Trevor Herriot
  • Financial Report
  • Election of Board

11:00   PPPI Roles & Projects

12:00   Lunch

12:45   Grassland photographs, an audio-visual presentation by Branimir Gjetvaj

1:00    “Nature connection and place attachment: Roles of personal attachment and motivation in conservation” – Katherine Arbuthnott

1:30     Where do we go from here?  Current situation concerning the pastures and objectives for the future – Lorne Scott

  • Interactive discussion with audience on current issues and future options

3:15     Next Steps

4:00     Adjournment

An RSVP is helpful but not required for attendance. If possible, to assist with planning for lunch and space, please RSVP to public4pastures@gmail.com or call (306)-515-0460.

A donation will be requested to cover the cost of lunch.

Parking is available in the parking lot North of the United Way building and the entrance to the Community Room is on the North side of the building.

The building is wheelchair accessible.

Campaign: 1000 Letters to the Premier

20 Mar

This is a request to the many people who expressed concern and interest in the future of the PFRA Community Pastures.

We are at a point where a large scale letter writing campaign is needed as we continue to work towards the continued public ownership and conservation of our pastures. Your letters need not be long. We are hoping to generate over 1000 letters in the next few weeks.

We need to get the message out that the public feels that:

  • It is vitally important to keep the pastures public
  • The public should pay for public values
  • The government must take on this responsibility
  • The public wants to know how the government will ensure that the pastures will continue to be managed for the many important public benefits.

Be sure to address your letters to Premier Wall. Be polite and make sure you ask for a reply.  Below are some points you may wish to talk about. There are also some sample letters here. Make your letters personal, explaining why retaining the pastures are important to you.

To write your letter begin by making some (but not all) of the “Important Points” listed below, and then ask one or two specific questions:
 

  1. “How will your government ensure that the pastures will continue to be managed for [choose your public benefit/issue from the points below]”
  1. “We all recognize that retaining land under public ownership is the highest form of protection for the long term. Please explain your government’s willingness to sell Crown lands that are among the most ecologically important and endangered landscapes in Canada.”

IMPORTANT POINTS
 

The following are several points about the PFRA pastures, some of which you may wish to refer to in your letter:
 

  • These grasslands are not merely agricultural land; they are important for grazing but also represent some of the last large protected areas of grassland on the continent. They must be managed with both grazing and biodiversity in mind.
  • Southern Saskatchewan contains one of the most modified landscapes in North America.
  • Some 80% of our natural landscape in southern Saskatchewan has been lost to development.
  • Only 15% of the natural landscape south of the forest fringe is public land, where public oversight can be provided.
  • It is critically important to preserve these vanishing native grasslands.
  • The PFRA Pastures are the most critically important remaining grasslands in Saskatchewan.
  • The PFRA pastures are a major part of this province’s Representatives Areas Network, a network of ecologically important land and water areas across the province.
  •  Canada has commitments to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature to preserve a portion of our landscape in its natural condition and the pastures are a major component of this in Saskatchewan.
  • The Prairies have a greater number of Species at Risk than any other region of Canada.
  • Over 30 Species at Risk are found on the PFRA pastures.
  • Carbon sequestration is an important benefit from native grasslands.
  • Soil and water conservation is provided by PFRA Pastures.
  • The pasture lands have many known heritage sites from Indigenous people and homesteaders. Many of the pastures have not yet been assessed for their archaeological potential or sites of a special nature such as sacred sites.
  • Keeping the lands public is the best way to protect these known and unknown sites.
  • The publicly-owned lands are important to enable Indigenous people to continue practices such as hunting and gathering, and practising respect for sacred sites.
  • These pastures are very important to producers for grazing opportunities. The first ten pastures to be transitioned have already lost 50% of their patrons.
  • PFRA Pastures are important for the local economy.
  • Pasture patrons are necessarily concerned first with their private interests as cattle producers. Unless they receive some support, it is not realistic to expect they will also care for the range of public goods that the PFRA pastures always provided to society as a whole.
  • Full time, qualified pasture managers are critical to the long term management of the pastures.
  • The pastures provide important access for hunting opportunities, generating $70 million dollars annually.
  • The total annual cost of operating the 62 PFRA Pastures is $22 million. The total annual benefits to producers and society is $55 million.
  • Keeping the pastures publicly-owned is the best way to protect the many benefits they provide.
  • Some kind of legislative protection is needed for pastures.
  • The many public benefits from public lands must be recognized and maintained with public dollars.
  •  Producers should not be expected to pay for public benefits.

Whatever points you raise in your letter, be sure to ask the Premier for a response to your question.

THANK YOU FOR TAKING THE TIME TO WRITE A LETTER.

YOUR SUPPORT IS GREATLY APPRECIATED!

GETTING THE LETTER TO THE PREMIER
 

You can mail, e-mail or fax the letter to the Premier.

E-mail: premier@gov.sk.ca, Fax: 306-787-0885, Phone: 306-787-9433

 
A letter sent in the mail carries more weight.

SARM coming around on pasture issues

20 Mar

From the Western Producer:

The turning point was a meeting about the pastureland issue at last week’s convention that attracted about 60 RMs and a few SARM directors.

It became clear at that meeting that SARM would now be taking the issue seriously and would be lobbying the province to come to some sort of agreement with the affected RMs.

 

Joint PFRA Pasture Study Released

10 Feb

APAS Calls for New Approach to PFRA Pasture Transition

February 10, 2015

Regina: Agricultural Producers Association of Saskatchewan (APAS), Community Pasture Patrons Association of Saskatchewan (CPPAS), Public Pastures – Public Interest (PPPI) and Saskatchewan Wildlife Federation (SWF) examined Saskatchewan’s approach to pasture transition and found it would adversely affect the livestock industry in Saskatchewan.

“We are asking the Saskatchewan Government to take a hard look at its current approach to the transition of the 62 PFRA pastures which affects 1.8 million acres or 2,500 ranchers,” says Norm Hall, APAS President. “The current process is inefficient, short and long-term costs will rise substantially for patrons, and public expectations and regulations for pastures could prove to be unworkable.”

The study (executive summary here) commissioned by the four partners is anchored in the following principles:

  • Conserving native grassland is critically important;
  • Land use should re-inforce the economic viability of our livestock sector;
  • Natural working ecosystems must be preserved over the long term;
  • Business and governance systems must be efficient and effective;
  • Producers should not be expected to pay for public benefits.

(Full Report can be found here.)

The approach taken by Saskatchewan is to increase revenues at the expense of producers and to offload responsibility for the environment from the public sector to pasture patrons. Pasture patrons are being asked to pay a full Crown land grazing rate. They are required to provide full public access and manage and report on the ecological, environmental and endangered species on native landscapes without required resources. “A level playing field is required,’ says Ian McCreary, CPPAS Chair.

“Preserving a working natural landscape where hunters and naturalists can share the pasture system into the future must be maintained,” says Darrell Crabbe, Executive Director, SWF. “Pasture patrons cannot be expected to shoulder the costs of sourcing the expertise required and providing ongoing public benefits.”

“APAS is concerned over the long term viability of the livestock industry in Saskatchewan,” says Hall. “We have a shrinking beef breeding herd and livestock producer numbers are falling. The current approach leads to a further acceleration of producers leaving the industry. Pasture patrons may fall by one-half. The current approach closes the opportunity for young producers to enter the industry. A different approach is needed if we are to build a strong, sustainable Saskatchewan livestock industry.”

Norm Hall
President, APAS

Ian McCreary
Chair, CPPAS

Darrell Crabbe
Executive Director, SWF

Trevor Herriot
Public Pastures-Public Interest

Prairie Pasture Tour! POSTPONED to Wed July 9

25 Jun

***POSTPONING Wednesday’s tour–it was scheduled for Jul 2 but we are going to give the pasture time to dry a bit and do the tour on WEDNESDAY JULY 9 now.

Join award-winning naturalist and author, Trevor Herriot, on Wednesday July 2 WEDNESDAY JULY 9  for a tour of a community pasture near Regina. Limit of 25 so register early by emailing sahengen[at]sasktel.net!

Pasture Tour

All proceeds will support the work of Public Pastures: Public Interests (PPPI) to help protect public interest in our Crown grasslands

Regina Event on Protecting Native Prairie

27 Feb

SASKATCHEWAN GRASSLANDS: WHY WE MUST PROTECT OUR REMAINING NATURAL PRAIRIE AND HOW

FEATURING TREVOR HERRIOT

THURSDAY MARCH 13, 7 pm

ST. MARKS LUTHERAN CHURCH HALL, 3510 QUEEN STREET

Saskatchewan’s grasslands are among the most endangered and human altered ecosystems in the world. Join us on March 13th to discuss and ask questions on:

  • Preservation of Saskatchewan’s community pastures and grasslands
  • How modern agriculture and oil and gas activity affects grasslands
  • Our complicity in habitat erosion and species extinction
  • The choices we all face

Much of what is left of Saskatchewan grasslands is found in community pastures. The federal government recently moved to shut down these pastures. Farmers, conservationists, ranchers and communities are demanding the government act to save key pastures. On Thursday March 13th, we invite you to learn why preserving our remaining grasslands is essential, and how to do it, as well as to discuss broader topics of sustainability, human choice, and the path forward.

First Nations Concerns Highlighted

10 Feb

The Vancouver Sun follows up on their January 30 article about management of the pastures, with a consideration of First Nations concerns.

“As management of five federally run Saskatchewan pastures is transferred to the province next month, some aboriginal groups who use and have lived on the land say they’re worried about the fate of historic First Nations sites and their ability to purchase the land in the future.“The consultation was zero to nil,” said former Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations chief Roland Crowe of the land transfer.”